White Collar Crime


White collar crimes are usually crimes of theft and deception that involve such issues as tax evasion, insurance fraud, counterfeiting, credit card fraud, computer fraud, embezzlement, insider trading, investment schemes, money laundering and campaign finance violations. 

White collar cases are usually more complex because the investigation doesn't just consist of a police officer observing criminal activity from a squad car, but rather, federal or state investigators often spend years connecting the dots” in bank and accounting records in order to nail down a suspect.

For most people accused of white collar crime, this marks their introduction to the criminal justice system. It’s frightening because most of these crimes are classified as felonies and the government is seeking a large fine or prison sentence to justify the time and resources spent on the case.

Usually, the alleged white collar scheme involves multiple people, but the police often assume that everyone had full knowledge of the conspiracy. That’s not necessarily the case. You may have been an innocent bystander who had no idea of the depths of fraud that your co-workers were involved in. Or, you may have truly intended to make money for your investors, but the plan didn't work out.Just because the investigative reports are long and detailed doesn't mean the government has a fool-proof case. 

If you or someone you know is under suspicion, protect your legal rights. Never talk to an official or answer questions until you have talked to an attorney who is experienced in defending white collar crime. Call us today at (210) 415-6662 to schedule your free consultation. 


The information on this website is for general information only. Nothing on this or associated pages, documents, comments, answers, emails, or other communications should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation.  The information on this website is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing of this information does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship

 

Law Office of Brent R. Hardy